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With over two decades of expertise in fine art printmaking, a distinguished educational background, and award-winning photography, Patrick Brooks Brandenburg is a trusted name in collectable artwork. Using time-tested, personally selected materials, he creates archival, one-of-a-kind pieces that will captivate both you and your guests.

With over two decades of expertise in fine art printmaking, a distinguished educational background, and award-winning photography, Patrick Brooks Brandenburg is a trusted name in collectable artwork. Using time-tested, personally selected materials, he creates archival, one-of-a-kind pieces that will captivate both you and your guests.

There are many ways to print a photograph. Given Patrick's extensive accolades and history, he isn't easily lured by the latest and shiniest print materials. At PBB, we rigorously test and retest to find the perfect materials for each photograph. Some images look best on textured fine art paper, while others excel on a smoother surface. However, we consistently believe in the archival longevity and high resolving power of pigment-based ink, with these microscopic dots meticulously placed throughout the PBB product lineup. We also believe in realizing each image to its fullest potential in the final proofed limited original. That is why we don’t offer any open editions here at PBB. Each piece is of the highest possible resolution and quality, signed and number for authenticity. 

There are many ways to print a photograph. Given Patrick's extensive accolades and history, he isn't easily lured by the latest and shiniest print materials. At PBB, we rigorously test and retest to find the perfect materials for each photograph. Some images look best on textured fine art paper, while others excel on a smoother surface. However, we consistently believe in the archival longevity and high resolving power of pigment-based ink, with these microscopic dots meticulously placed throughout the PBB product lineup. We also believe in realizing each image to its fullest potential in the final proofed limited original. That is why we don’t offer any open editions here at PBB. Each piece is of the highest possible resolution and quality, signed and number for authenticity. 

Big Sur Sun Beams
Lone Bison
Windswept Juniper
Curation/Mock-Ups

"What do you shoot?"

I get this question a lot. Let's start from the beginning. My very first camera back in 1998 was a Canon AE-1 35mm film camera with a fixed canon 50mm f/1.8. I used this camera throughout High School and even into my first couple semesters at Brooks Institute.

Growing up in the film age was a blessing. Learning how to expose scenes manually using BDE (basic daylight exposure) and memorizing other important foundational & fundamental techniques helps me to this day. When people approach me, eager to learn about photography and ask for recommendations on what camera to buy, they are often surprised by my response. I tell them to get a film camera capable of taking manual exposures. This method teaches you a great deal about how light behaves in photography.

Growing up in the film age was a blessing. Learning how to expose scenes manually using BDE (basic daylight exposure) and memorizing other important foundational & fundamental techniques helps me to this day. When people approach me, eager to learn about photography and ask for recommendations on what camera to buy, they are often surprised by my response. I tell them to get a film camera capable of taking manual exposures. This method teaches you a great deal about how light behaves in photography.

I still shoot film when the subject matter and situation allow. I’ve upgraded to a custom-made 4x10 Canham Camera, which can also be converted to a 4x5. It’s the original mirrorless camera! Why still film, you ask? Consider a new full-frame digital (35mm) camera with a sensor area of 864mm². In contrast, a 4x5" film sheet has an area of 12,827mm². Double that for the 4x10" film I sometimes use. The 4x5 film has 15 times the area of a 35mm sensor, and the 4x10 film has 30 times the area. Those who shoot large-format film can attest to the lifelike feel of the output. Light has much more space to spread out over the film than over a smaller sensor, resulting in unrivaled gradations and details. That said, these giant cameras are challenging to shoot with! You view the image upside down and then go blind once the film is loaded. The benefits are amazing, but the challenges are many. While I love to slow down and shoot with my large-format setup, I often find myself reaching for my Canon cameras the most. If you learn how to use new technology correctly, the results can be astounding.

I still shoot film when the subject matter and situation allow. I’ve upgraded to a custom-made 4x10 Canham Camera, which can also be converted to a 4x5. It’s the original mirrorless camera! Why still film, you ask? Consider a new full-frame digital (35mm) camera with a sensor area of 864mm². In contrast, a 4x5" film sheet has an area of 12,827mm². Double that for the 4x10" film I sometimes use. The 4x5 film has 15 times the area of a 35mm sensor, and the 4x10 film has 30 times the area. Those who shoot large-format film can attest to the lifelike feel of the output. Light has much more space to spread out over the film than over a smaller sensor, resulting in unrivaled gradations and details. That said, these giant cameras are challenging to shoot with! You view the image upside down and then go blind once the film is loaded. The benefits are amazing, but the challenges are many. While I love to slow down and shoot with my large-format setup, I often find myself reaching for my Canon cameras the most. If you learn how to use new technology correctly, the results can be astounding.